Financial institutions are always seen as serious. After all money and finance are usually a serious topics but the education process doesn’t have to be so. Financial events can be made fun just like how Stacks House did theirs.

Built in the style of other Instagram museums like the Museum of Ice Cream, Color Factory, and 29Rooms, Stacks House features a maze of interactive rooms but tackles a trickier topic than most pop-ups with more whimsical concepts.

“We don’t think money is all that complicated, but it can trigger complicated emotions, which often paralyze us from moving forward,” explained Patience Ramsey, co-founder of She Stacks, the creators of Stacks House. “Marrying financial empowerment with a platform that is joyful and share-worthy changes the conversation and allows us to talk about these things and approach solving them in a way that is positive, communal, and, dare we say, fun.”

She Stacks, the brainchild of personal finance expert Farnoosh Torabi and experiential marketing veterans Ramsey and Kindra Meyer, aims to promote financial independence and close the gap between women and wealth through products, content, and experiences.

Stacks House helps break down key financial goals such as earning more, saving, eliminating debt, and investing wisely, with rooms such as the Debt Boxing Gym, the Retirement Rodeo presented by Charles Schwab, and Money Moves from Stacks House’s presenting sponsor Zelle, a digital payments network owned by Early Warning Services.

D14F8F8A0E2A40A092B304A2C65BF9FCZelle’s sponsored room includes a house facade, complete mailbox and patches of grass.Photo: Courtesy of Stacks House

“To be able to partner with Stacks House, to bring financial education to life in a really fun, simple, and sexy way, we thought that was an exciting way for us to do things a little bit differently and help people understand how to make smart money moves and use Zelle in their daily lives,” explained Melissa Lowry, vice president of brand marketing at the payment service company.

The sponsored room highlights three of the brand’s top use cases, including re-gifting, travel costs, and day-to-day expenses. For example, the travel area features a tropical arch covered in vines and aims to encourage women to feel comfortable splitting the cost of a girls’ weekend.

Ramsey said that Stacks House is designed to attract “hard-working, side-hustling, culturally attuned, ethnically diverse, modern women rising up to create their best selves.” Lowry added that “it is more focused on women, millennials, and Gen Z, [those] who would be open to this idea of an experiential pop-up. It is a different way of engaging with financial matters that’s really fun, very shareable.”

Like other ‘gram-worthy pop-up experiences, though, it comes at a cost. The creators feel that it’s worth the investment. “We landed on our price point based on what previous pop-ups have charged guests,” Ramsey said, “and actually think that since our pop-up offers a real purpose—financial literacy and empowerment—as well as an ongoing community and education through our newsletter that $38 is a value. That said, we offer discounts and special prices for large groups.”

“We’re not going to be able to tackle everything, but we can make it simple and fun so people are willing to start a conversation, start having that initial dialogue around money,” Lowry said. “If it can make the topic of money a little less taboo and teach people a few things about how to get started then that’s a huge win.”

F268DAB7F4BE4985B191C94AD411AC8CThe pop-up’s exterior features a graffiti-style tag line and social handle.Photo: Courtesy of Stacks House

MR1The money-covered infinity room lets visitors see into their financial futures.Photo: Courtesy of Stacks House

Money Moves1The travel-inspired photo op in Zelle’s Money Moves room features a tropical arch covered in vines.Photo: Courtesy of Stacks House

Image123986672(2)At the Gold Bar, presented by Day Owl Wine, guests can sip rosé.Photo: Courtesy of Stacks House

Source: BizBash